All Candidates for Mayor and Councillors were sent a question are that directly talks to the small to medium sized developers, trades, and industry professionals. All candidates were emailed a minimum of 2 times. The answers are posted below by ward and in alphabetical order. CICBA – Calgary Inner City Builders Association and its volunteers want to better the industry so huge shout out to the volunteers.


Mayoral Candidates – Alphabetical Order

Mayoral Candidates – Alphabetically

Jan Damery

What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: This spring and summer, as I’ve engaged with Calgarians following the Guidebook debacle, I’ve found broad support for redevelopment. I have yet to identify a single policy element which there is general disagreement. What there is is a general unease with the results of redevelopment as it happens today—whether replacing a single house with a single executive infill, or the building of a block end with 4 or 6 units. The protection of street trees is important, as is setback and lot coverage. We need to do better as a city to accommodate redevelopment while protecting our streetscape. While neighbourhood character is often distilled into an opposition to density, from my conversations it seems to me to instead be about seeing the end result of redevelopment as lowering the quality of a continuous street, mostly through a gap in the tree canopy. This extends as a worry that if the majority of a street was redeveloped in a short time, that the tree canopy would be broken up. I hope that redevelopment can help Calgary’s older communities thrive, retain existing amenities, and where possible support 15-minute city walkable neighbourhoods. I fear that unless Calgary completes the Local Area Planning process and is able to speed approvals, that market forces will not allocate enough of Calgary’s unit growth in established areas.

  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: The market needs to allocate between the developments, but the city cannot assume that the market is operating fairly today. Today, 4 or 6 units in a redevelopment project are subject to similarly onerous red-tape as 5,000 unit projects in greenfield, tilting the playing field massively in favour of greenfield development. This is unacceptable. Not striving to meet MDP targets will result in higher taxes and longer commutes for all. Calgary must examine whether the LAP process and the MDP support our MDP targets, or whether processes need to be changed to level the playing field.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: I have seen many proposals for allocating the cost of city services among properties of different types, and I have yet to see one which, while addressing current issues, does not create other, possibly more serious issues, especially those of vertical and horizontal equity. For redevelopment specifically, today the benefits of redevelopment are too diffuse—too spread out over time and area. We must as policies are examined over the next few years ensure that local immediate benefits are not ignored.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: No, it would be inequitable, with far more funding flowing to high property value neighbourhoods. I am in full support of a block, or neighbourhood banding together to impose local improvements and/or special taxes to support infrastructure and services.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Affordability is an issue, yet so is the City of Calgary’s ability to deliver services. As your members have identified, saved time is valuable. Seeking to save time for CICBA’s members would be my focus. By focusing first on saving time, we can reform processes without setting City Hall and your members in a zero sum game. Reducing approval times by 25% is likely to be far more valuable to CICBA’s members than reducing fees by 25%.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: In policy discussions of a broad nature, CICBA needs to organize its members, and show up for public hearings. It should collect statistics on the number of units its members have built, and how many are in the development process. It should gather statistics on average time to approval from document submission, and identify roadblocks and duplicative processes with data.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Council needs to focus on outcomes, and stop wasting time on procedural games and petty squabbles.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: Planning for the next 4 year budget cycle will begin almost immediately after the municipal election. My priority will be advancing my policy proposals through the Council Directive process to ensure that over the next four years the City of Calgary lays the foundation to: Make Calgary a Top Global Destination to Live, Learn, Work and Play; Generate 80,000 Jobs by 2030; and, Include Everyone in Our Recovery.
  • Name: Jan Damery
  • Website: www.jandamery.com/
  • Email: elect@jandamery.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Jeff Davison

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: Redevelopment is an important way to increase density in our existing neighbourhoods, and is one of the ways that we can revitalize Calgary’s inner city. As Mayor, I will work to reduce the red tape involved in applying for development permits–we need to move at the speed of business, not the speed of City Hall. We also need to make sure that inner city redevelopments have meaningful community consultation in proposed areas that hears and addresses existing residents concerns.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: I support the MDP target of 50/50 growth. Calgarians want choice in where they live. Some Calgarians will continue to choose new neighbourhoods, while many Calgarians will find inner city developments a more appealing option. The market plays a role in determining the right balance, but there is much more we can and should do to make inner city redevelopment a bigger part of our city’s growth. That includes making it easier to get these projects off the ground.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: No. Look at North East for an example – an entire quadrant of the City has been underserved for decades leading to a significant infrastructure deficit, as highlighted by the lack of parks and playfields in those communities. The solution has to recognize dollars are tight but the desire is to ensure ALL Calgarians receive services equitably. The buildout of Calgary has not been equal, and as City leaders, I would work with every Ward Councillor to determine priorities across our City. On financing our proposals, I believe that the City of Calgary needs to be nimble. For example, the City is one of the largest private industrial landowners in the City – I would work with our Real Estate and Development Services department to determine which assets are profitable and can be sold to accommodate equitable reinvestment and service delivery.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: I don’t support this approach as it may leave “have not” areas as poorly served. I think transparency and planning are key to ensure Calgarians understand why a significant investment is being made in a particular part of Calgary. I believe if Calgarians understand the objective they will support the actions.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Affordability is definitely an issue in Calgary for the residential and non-residential sectors. That’s one of the reasons why I plan to freeze residential property taxes and cut corporate tax as Mayor. People and businesses are struggling enough right now in Calgary, and they don’t need any additional burden imposed by City Hall. I also believe that Calgary needs to increase its stock of affordable housing, including in established areas. I am open to the possibility of incentives to ensure that Calgary’s affordable housing needs are met.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: No – unfortunately, I feel that I haven’t heard from the CICBA especially when issues have come before Council. Inner-City redevelopment will has an important role to play in the development and build-up of Calgary, and I encourage the CICBA to be more active and vocal in the conversations around redevelopment.I encourage CICBA to involved when contentious issues come before Council – have meetings with our Councillors and make strong, unified cases at Council and Committee meetings.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: For me, accountability and credibility means listening to what Calgarians want and doing it. My priorities are Calgarians priorities. The mayor and council need to be willing to work together to build the things that Calgarians really want instead of focusing on their own image or grandstanding. As Mayor, I’m committed to listening to Calgarians, working with my colleagues on council constructively, and seeking input widely, because I recognize that one person does not have all the answers.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: As Mayor, my top three priorities are: Economic Diversification: by supporting initiatives like Downtown plan, Green Line LRT, and Banff-Calgary-Airport Rail, River’s District Development including the Event Centre Keeping Calgary Affordable: supporting small business by reducing business taxes, freezing residential taxes, and building up affordable housing Building a Calgary for Everyone: focusing on reconciliation, diversity and inclusion and the environment. I don’t think that we need to delay the priorities of the last City Council – as many of the policies created in the last four years are only now being implemented. For example, projects the like downtown revitalization and the Green Line LRT project need to continue. Rather, we need to broadly assess and review the impact of the last Council’s policies and make changes as needed – as opposed to scraping everything and starting new again.
  • Name: Jeff Davison
  • Website: www.jeffdavisonyyc.com
  • Email: davison2021@jeffdavisonyyc.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Jeromy Farkas

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: I am in favour of well thought-out inner-city development in areas where it makes sense. Consultation with community members on development needs to be effective and genuine.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: I will approach development on a case-by-case basis. Any new development, be it inner-city or greenfield needs a solid business case and thoughtful consultation.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: City spending has grown year after year and the tax burden on Calgarians is unacceptable. Every year, taxpayers are asked to pay more to receive the same or less service. City hall needs to reign in spending and get taxes under control to prove to people they’re getting value for their money.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?:
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: City Hall needs to get out of the way to make it easier to do business in Calgary. I share your frustration with red tape, complex processes, and long approval times. Addressing these issues and getting taxes under control is key to making it more affordable to live and do business in Calgary.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: There are many opportunities for improved communication with City Hall. As Mayor, my door will always be open to meet and hear your concerns.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Accountability and transparency will be top of mind for me as Mayor. To establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians, Council needs to be open, honest, and lead by example. It’s clear that Calgarians reject closed door meetings and back room deals. Meaningful consultation is necessary to build trust with Calgarians. Often, City Hall consultation feels like nothing more than a box to check, rather than the genuine collaboration that it should be. Council needs to lead by example to build trust and confidence. As Councillor, I turned down the overly generous 5 to 1 pension because I genuinely believe the Councillor pension plan needs to be reformed.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: My top 3 priorities are jobs and economic growth, an accountable City Hall, and safe, livable communities. Positive change begins with reining in taxes, simplifying approvals, eliminating unnecessary red tape and allowing entrepreneurs to succeed.
  • Name: Jeromy Farkas
  • Website: jeromy.ca
  • Email: policy@jeromy.ca
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Jyoti Gondek

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: Presently, redeveloping communities are not benefitting from infrastructure upgrades that should accompany growth. We don’t have a proper model of capital investment for redevelopment, relying instead on pushing all costs to the private sector which results in stagnation as the risk is too high. My goal is to ensure that capital and operating budgets clearly reflect the goal of sustainable growth in redeveloping areas.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: We must move beyond divisive “urban-versus-suburban” debates so we can focus on having holistic, productive conversations on how best to grow as a city. We must realize that well-managed growth has huge benefits for Calgary, both economically and socially. The issue we have with missing the 50/50 target is the lack of a plan for infrastructure investment in redeveloping areas. Much like the offsite levy system, established areas deserve a clear methodology for funding redevelopment. We started with a $30 million seed fund for established area public realm improvements in 2020. More must follow.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: In Calgary, like in any growing city, municipal service delivery is dynamic and complex. Accordingly, we must regularly review local demands for services as neighbourhood populations change and development occurs. How services are financed must also be reviewed. The City is only beginning the long-overdue work of assessing equitable service delivery across Calgary, with many important conversations on the horizon surrounding our 2023-2026 budget cycle.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: As part of the Established Areas Growth and Change Strategy, the City is examining the use of property tax uplifts to fund local community infrastructure. A related pilot project is currently underway within the North Hill Communities. The usefulness of this funding tool will be better understood once the pilot project is complete.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Affordability is an important issue and an urgent reality for so many Calgarians. The City must comprehensively examine all regulatory factors and barriers to identify opportunities for improving housing affordability across the continuum. Greater variety in housing type and tenure (i.e. rental/ownership/coop) in all communities is critical. For subsidized housing, organizations like the Terner Centre for Housing Innovation have created tools that illustrate the costs and benefits of public-private partnerships for delivering units.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: The decision of many small- and medium-sized businesses within Calgary’s development industry to organize through CICBA is a welcome addition to our local real estate stakeholder community. I have had the opportunity to meet with your board and echo many of your concerns about our current situation. I have also taken action with changes to budgeting processes that focus on funding redevelopment.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Accountability and credibility go hand-in-hand. Effective leadership requires carefully listening to stakeholders before shaping the important decisions that impact our communities. To earn the trust and confidence of Calgarians, our incoming Council will need to establish itself as a united and cohesive body that is capable of addressing the issues facing our city.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: Amongst the competing priorities before the new Council in Fall 2021, three priority areas are: 1) fixing the budget process to better reflect a desire for 50/50 growth, 2) completing the Green Line, and 3) revitalizing our downtown.
  • Name: Jyoti Gondek
  • Website: www.jyotigondek.ca/
  • Email: vote@jyotigondek.ca
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Zac Hartley

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: My hopes are that all new re-developments are done with the best interest of the citizens as the top priority.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: The balance between where we build should be determined by the market conditions and where the citizens of Calgary want to live. We need to make sure that we have affordable housing both inside the city core as well as in the new communities, but after that, it should be up to the market and people to determine where we invest our resources.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: No, the costs are not being fairly divided. If a new community cost more to service, then the residents that live in that community should be responsible for bearing the additional costs of servicing that community.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: No. This would drastically favour the high income neighbourhoods and the low income neighbourhoods that need the most help, would take the longest time to save enough money for that help or re-development. If we tax high income communities and keep the money in high income communities, that does not solve any problems…
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Yes, it is an issue. I plan to create incentive programs that will help our builders and developers convert empty office space in the downtown core into affordable apartments. I plan to reduce property tax by diversifying our revenue streams and charging foreign owned, large, profitable corporations to do business in Calgary. This income will directly offset property tax and lower the cost of living in Calgary.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: No I do not. Please e-mail me to set up a meeting.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Accountability looks like having real action plans with definitive results and targets that can be measured against and are time based with people that are responsible for the results. In order to build trust with Calgarians I would like to see city counsel take the following steps: Create a user friendly and easy to access way for Calgarians to see councillor and mayor votes without having to watch full meetings or read meeting minutes. The citizens of Calgary need better access to see where their councillors and mayor stand on major issues and votes. Reduce councillor and mayor compensation Develop a focus on reducing that tax burden for citizens of Calgary starting with property tax.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: 1. Reduce property tax by diversifying Calgary revenue streams 2. re-route the greenline to the airport and make sure that the 5.5 Billion dollars is spent in the best interest of Calgarians. 3. Donate 50% of my salary each and every month to local charities and non profits and work to reduce executive compensation in order to ease the burden on Calgary citizens.
  • Name: Zac Hartley
  • Website: www.zacformayor.com
  • Email: info@zacformayor.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Dean Hopkins

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: My focus for the next 4 years is to provide more low income community housing for first time buyers, social housing initiatives and more homes for seniors. Future development projects should focus on bringing older communities into the 20th century and aim to improve the quality of life to citizens living in those communities. We need to work in collaboration with developers to lower city fees in order to make development projects more affordable and cost effective for the developers and the customers.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: Development of a community is very important , parks and green space is a vital asset when we focus on the wellbeing of a community and city. Re-zoning green space to conduct development projects is not on my agenda for the next 4 years, however I am only one vote. New communities, as they are developed, require to be cost effective and provide enough tax revenue for emergency service expansion.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: No, I don’t believe service levels are fairly delivered across the city. I will be advising councillors that we need to take more control over our spending at city hall. I’ll be sharing with council that we need to change the way we have distributed our budget in the past to city services. I will be encouraging council that we should move our city to an on demand budgeting system which would be implemented over a three year period and which allows funds to be redistributed to areas of need. This will give city hall more control over its budget during the tax year. Contracts with all service providers will need to be reviewed to ensure we as a city are receiving quality services. Any discrepancies or failures will result in contacts been canceled and new ones being developed.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: No, some older communities need more upgrades and subsequently more funds spending on those upgrades. Having a pool of funds available gives council more flexibility to prioritize projects.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Yes affordability is an issue in our city. I will be advising councillors that building permits and other development permit costs need to be reassessed at city hall. Only through collaboration between developers and the city can we bring down the price of developments, making property more affordable for groups to build and then enable the cost of housing to be reduced for the customers.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: I do believe you have a voice however in some cases it’s not been listened to by council. Communication and collaboration is essential to getting things completed on time and within budget. Understanding your new councillors vision for development over the next 4 years will help move projects along smoothly. Connect with your wards councillor , their view on this will point is key for you.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Accountability and the credibility of this present council has been brought into question a number of time over the past 5 years. Once credibility is lost it is very hard to regain. I will be advising the new councillors that the ethics committee and the general public will be holding them accountable for all their actions and that they have to be open and honest about all their dealings over the next 4 years. I will personally hold councillors and myself accountable for any failings by city hall. Transparency is key!
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: 1. Better support of our emergency services . 2. Lower business taxes by 10% for the next 2 years before implementing any type of increase on the 3rd year. 3. Take control of our cities spending and convert the current budget system to an On Demand format this will hold city departments accountable for their annual budget. Would not be dedicating 200mil dollars to the downtown belt line. No further funding for the arena, no further funding for the green line until our economy is under control. No major legacy projects to take place during this new administration until our economy has seen recovery.
  • Name: Dean Hopkins
  • Website: Deanhopkinsyyc.ca
  • Email: Deanhopkinsyyc@gmail.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Teddy Ogbonna

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: Teddy supports redevelopment that carries and or engages communities – residents along prior to execution by locals. Redevelopment that would be sustainable and avoid foreign influence on such e.g., Teddy would like to see what\\’s going on in Vancouver not to happen here in Calgary.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: Balancing these two areas of development would need a total revaluation of the MDP to ensure downtown, beltline and inner city communities groups are engaged in the process for a new document and or plan where home and business owners would carry out energy efficient development/redevelopment and pretty much cost Tax payers nothing while protecting our shared values and traditions i.e. Greenfields and heritage buildings.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: There is no way we can satisfy everyone. That\\’s why we have voting rights when local residents participate on issues like this. Bridging the gap is basically to raise awareness of such development/redevelopment within the community through every medium available for an extensive period of time and let residents debate on it and finally vote. Service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs are NOT being fairly delivered and allocated across the City. We need to have sustained dialogue on this at the City- create an independent oversight committee that would review and make recommendations. City of Calgary has to be transparent, fair, inclusive and accountable to Calgarians.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: That may create imbalance and real ’segregation’ of communities because homeowners, people and business are on different tax bracket most folks are not happy with the way our taxes has doubled and some cases tripled – way through the roof. How about non-established area and or communities?
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Affordability is an issue in Calgary for both residential and non-residential sectors and Teddy is looking forward to a conversation where groups like CICBA would bring to the table their agenda just like any other company or lobbyist. We need to open our municipal government up -open registry of local actors advocating or bidding for any issue. No closed door meetings. All group\\’s voices should and must be heard, Calgarians first. Affordability is not just an issue. We have accessibility -access to power issues as well, which has to be be addressed so people don\\’t feel left out.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: Nope. That\\’s why Teddy is campaigning on inclusion and equity. Transparency and accountability. Where voices like CICBA would be even with others and on same table. This election is about our City and not the 1%. Or folks who are working behind the scenes to assist communist CHINA on their agenda to take over.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Accountability and credibility is the core of basic foundation of any democratic institution and where the centre can not hold, then things would fall apart. The City of Calgary current councilors and Mayor has not been honest, have lost credibility, no accountability and lacks a visionary leader who would accept and or acknowledge responsibility. Teddy is running an inclusive race to get the confidence, trust, accountability and credibility back – Genuine , respectful, honest and quality leadership that would be accountable to Calgarians.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: 1. Capping taxes at 10% – homeowners and businesses over 4 years. 2. Introduce a Shadow Youth Cabinet – Young people are the future and foundation of this City- so they have a voice and be part of the decision making process. 3. Inner City removal – priority. Teddy would delay the Green line- expand BRT and handicap access for seniors for immediate accessibility and affordability. Teddy would revaluate top City managers, elected officials and chief\\’s salaries – needs to be cut to 25-30% It is public service. Teddy would freeze hiring at the City of Calgary for 1-2 years. Teddy would remove all anti-racism BS office and commissions. Let us work to change policies and or procedures that may appear to biased and not inclusive of all races – from First Nations, White Settlers to new immigrants. Teddy would review or recycling -organic process and go back to the old ones of black and blue. It is a cash grab at the moment. Let\\’s work together to put our landfills on a technological renewable path where waste could be converted into reusables products -waste to wealth.
  • Name: Teddy Ogbonna
  • Website: www.teddy4calgary.ca/
  • Email: teddy4mayor2021@gmail.cominfo@teddy4calgary.ca
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

    I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Shaoli Wang

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: Some data is needed for this topic. Since 2003, by 2019, (1) City of Calgary’s population growth was 39%, while city’s fulltime employee increased 47%, this is a negative efficiency; (2) inflation was 32%, City’s average salary increased 64%, twice of the inflation, this is a bigger negative efficiency; (3) per capita municipal residential property tax increased 129%, over 4 times of inflation, this is a huge tax hike; (4) compared with 2003, between 2011-2019, municipal over inflation and population growth property tax cumulated $4.6 billion, while city’s over inflation and population salary increase cumulated $4.8 billion, over 100% of the property tax hike goes to City’s overpaid salary, “increase tax or cut service” is by sound evidence proven 100% fallacy. The City has been taking everything as a source of revenue for their overpaid salary. Before fixing it, City will continue to create conflicts between you and communities.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: 50/50 is a joke! There is only one balance, that is a city for people, and you are part of people.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: No, the City was allocating more costs to developers, pushing communities harder, but with a goal too much for its pocket. I will change it.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: It\'s better not to tax our people the first place, Paying back tax means no better than over taxation going back by half. I will 1. Roll back Mayor\'s pay by 20% from 2019 level. 2. Cut municipal residential property tax 15% by 2023, 23.5% by 2025 from 2019 level; Cut municipal non-residential property tax 20% by 2023, 26% by 2025 from 2019 level. 3. Secure frontline service, freeze hiring, cut pay and expense, shed off overstaffing.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: We can not reach affordability before climbing out of this crisis.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: I\'ve mad two presentations in City Hall, nobody has a voice been heard, and running this election becomes the only option for us all.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: Tell me which of these 15 Councils have any accountability?
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: My priorities are: 2. Cut municipal residential property tax 15% by 2023, 23.5% by 2025 from 2019 level; Cut municipal non-residential property tax 20% by 2023, 26% by 2025 from 2019 level. 3. Secure frontline service, freeze hiring, cut pay and expense, shed off overstaffing. 4. Halt the Green Line, Arena and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation\'s expanding and renovation projects. 5. Lower crime rate, restore Police Pride. Hold up 10% CPS budget and bind it with crime rate reversely, push for community policing. You may find theirs conflict with mine.
  • Name: Shaoli Wang
  • Website: www.shaoliw.com
  • Email: voteshaoliwang@gmail.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum

Grace Yan

  • What are your hopes and fears about redevelopment in established areas?: My hopes are that Calgary will put redevelopment as a priority, as opposed to contributing to more urban sprawl. It is often more economical to repurpose communities than it is to build new communities that need servicing (police, fire, community centers). Thoughtful redevelopment contributes to a city’s vibrancy, attracting buyers and tourists. We must ensure that redevelopment is done in a strategic manner than maintains or increases a community’s appeal.
  • Often the growth between the amount of development in the city’s greenfield areas (new communities) and the amount of development/redevelopment taking place within the established areas (downtown, beltline and inner citycommunities) is posed as a debate. The Municipal Development Plan (MDP) strives for 50/50 growth between these two forms, and redevelopment continues to struggle in achieving that target.  What is your position on how to balance these two areas of development?: Calgary can’t afford to keep building out. I think that the 50/50 rule needs to be re-evaluated, with an onus put on redevelopment and building upward as opposed to outward.
  • Do you believe that the service levels to Calgarians, and their associated costs – are being fairly delivered and allocated across the City? If so, please explain.  If not, do you have any ideas on how you might change this – beyond going to the Province for an increased share of remitted taxes?: Each community has individual requirements and funding needs. There is no one size fits all. People often don\'t like change but necessary change can be made more palatable by engaging communities and redevelopers. Your next question provides an excellent mechanism for providing incentive to community members to take responsibility for achieving desired outcomes.
  • Do you think that the idea of segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from, in order tosupport improved infrastructure and service in established areas – is a good idea?: I do think that segregating a portion of taxes back into the communities they come from is a good idea. Communities should have a say on how they want their money to be spent. When a portion of taxes go back to the respective communities, people see value in paying taxes and are empowered to be involved in shaping their communities.
  • Do you think that affordability is an issue in Calgary – for both residential and non-residential sectors? If you believe it is an issue, what ideas do you have to help improve affordability in established areas?: Affordability is an issue in Calgary as is unnecessary red tape and regulatory barriers. Adding costs and time sinks is a mechanism that lobbyists have used to ensure reduced competition. This negatively impacts smaller players and buyers. We need to seriously evaluate ways to improve efficiencies. I look forward to working with CICBA to best determine how we can level the playing field and cut burdensome expenses.
  • CICBA speaks for the small and medium players in the redevelopment sector of our industry. Do you feel that you have effectively heard our voice at Council and more broadly within the City in policy discussions? If so, where/when? If not, how could that be improved?: I hear your concerns and fully agree that representation needs to be fair and equitable. I plan to ensure that all advisory boards are fairly representative of all businesses and citizens, regardless of whether or not they have “deep pockets.” Small businesses are the backbone of Canada and it is of utmost importance to me to find every way to support and enable their successes. I\'d like to open up the lines of communication so that smaller players can be heard on their own terms. As mayor, I will appoint someone to do outreach with industry sectors to hear their ideas on how to make improvements. I don\'t want people to feel they need to join a board to be heard. We will come to you.
  • What does accountability and credibility look like at the council and mayoral level? What actions and behaviours would this new council need to demonstrate to establish trust and build confidence with Calgarians?: In order to establish and maintain trust, council needs to represent more than just corporate interests. While corporations are important to the city, so are new start-ups and established smaller players. As an entrepreneur in commercial real estate, I have worked in tandem with many small redevelopers, builders and trades so I understand the numerous challenges they face, and I believe that I can be a powerful advocate at city council. When there is over dilution, nothing gets accomplished. I am a business woman first and foremost. I believe in creating solutions that produce positive results in a cost-effective manner. City council talks and talks but we see very little action or results. This needs to change. Actions speak louder than words. The only way to truly establish trust is to deliver on promises.
  • We will experience a large turnover in our Civic Government this year, with a new mayor and over half of Calgary’s city council seats likely to take on new faces. In the past, councils have struggled with establishing a focused vision – over time the vision becomes ‘all encompassing’ to avoid offense, but having too many priorities dilutes resources and efforts towards effective outcomes. What ‘top 3’ priorities and outcomes would you promote over the next 4 year term, and what current priorities would you remove or delay in order to achieve them?: I am a consensus builder and collaborator. I\'m not so worried about possibly offending other politicians. City Hall works on behalf of the people and politicians need to remember that city hall’s job is to produce effective results for Calgarians, not pander to their own egos. A top priority for me is to help businesses so they can thrive long term as well as to ensure that high priority services (police, fire, EMT) are well funded. This can be accomplished by: – Dropping the commercial to residential property tax gap from 4 -1 to 2-1. – Selling non-essential city assets to cover reduced commercial taxes. – As assets are privatized it will free up operating budget for essential services. I will review priorities and address which current priorities made under Nenshi\'s terms should be removed or delayed in a strategic fashion during my first 100 days.
  • Name: Grace Yan
  • Website: www.graceyanformayor.com/
  • Email: grace@graceyanformayor.com
  • If you would like to have a discussion forum with our members on these questions, please click the option below and our team will reach out to arrange the forum


Councillor Candidates – Alphabetically by Ward

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Ward 1

Jacob Mcgregor

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: The development around and construction of the Rocky Ridge YMCA. This will be a community hub for years to come!
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Flood mitigation efforts as part of redevelopment in Bowness have been slow ineffective, and largely inadequate for years.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: I would have to say the re development of 12 mile coulee park in Tuscany along with its pathway system.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Maybe not “is not” but “will not be” beneficial. Greenwood/Greenbrier is seeing the development of new town houses and residential projects. Much of this neighbourhood is low income and residing in a mobile home park. The fear is twofold; first that the new development will drive up prices beyond affordability. Second, Development will continue unabated and swallow their homes entirely.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I think it’s pretty clear they don’t given the consistent barriers to affordability they’ve put up
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I do think this is an issue, on a personal level not feeling heard is one of the major reasons I decided to run. Calgary can’t have an effective City building strategy leaving small and medium sized developers out of the conversation. My door will always be open to CICBA and it’s members and I will advocate for their seat at the table
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Honest, open, communication. Keeping your promises, making decisions that are best for your Ward and explaining them clearly.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: Firstly we can make the process easier and incentivize projects like affordable/accessible housing, but smaller developers could be helped along via an improved; clear and concise online permit application portal and effective communication by the City
  • Name: Jacob McGregor
  • Website: jacobforward1.ca/
  • Email: jacob@jacobforward1.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 1
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

_______________

Ward 2

Jennifer Wyness

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Communities in Ward 2 are typically less than 25 years old, and include new communities still being established. Redevelopment within Ward 2 is not usually financially viable. However, redevelopment in more established communities helps the City build more complete communities (including Ward 2) with a better balance of resources and amenities. Currently new communities on the outer edges of the city are being built with higher density than traditional R1 communities closer to the downtown core that are 70 to 50 years old. This forces families to travel further distances for work and school, and puts pressure on those amenities on communities that were established 20 to 30 years ago. The issue I have with highlighting one specific example is it leads to the mindset that we should always be chasing big projects. Where redevelopment of inner city communities is most successful is when the city allows for flexibility in zoning to create wholistic communities and supports development incentives that are supported by current market factors instead of pushing for density that might be supported by a market in 40 years. A general example is taking half a block of 70 year old R1 houses in an inner city community and forcing developers to build an apartment complex that covers half the block. I am more supportive of smaller walkup type density builds such as fourplexes to 12 unit buildings that can be supported by current market demand and builds a more connected community of people.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: I think when the City is too idealistic on redevelopment, and or too rigid on outcome they can overbuild a community to the point where connectivity is lost between people. When a large 15 plus apartment building is built in communities of single family homes and duplexes, it has a negative impact on how people interact. It can also skew property prices and development expectations that cause R1 houses to dilapidate and become abandoned real estate holdings while developers wait for the next opportunity to build a large apartment complex. This can be improved by city council supporting medium density builds, and working with constituents to communicate the negative impacts of such drastic changes in buildings and the influence that will have on the connectiveness of their community.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: There is very little redevelopment of land that wasn’t farm land prior in Ward 2. I think we should look at being more flexible in our zoning requirements of commercial and retail space to have more complete communities.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Fundamentally the benefit to Ward 2 is when inner city development and density helps support the city’s ability to provide amenities to all Calgarians.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: My approach to development and how I see Calgary’s future is a balanced and flexible approach to development. I want to see communities that are more connected and wholistic. I see a focus on live, work, interact, and play being the best approach to building our communities. We need to densify our inner city communities to keep taxes down, we also need greenfield developments to keep house prices affordable. There are markets for both, and I do not see the future of Calgary’s development as a choice between the two.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: To support inner city developers, I think we need to allow more market driven development. By this I mean flexible zoning and more medium density builds. An example would be to take one or two R1 lots and build small walkup apartments, vs pushing developers to buy 5 or 6 lots and build a condo complex. I think to do this we need to find the common ground in the community, and that is to keep communities feeling connected to their neighbours. Additionally, I think that smaller and more frequent medium density builds help keep a more consistent level of work, and sustains jobs and employers better over longer periods. Small builders are a huge source of employment for the city. They supply a product that is in demand in the market, and they help build density without causing the issue of large blocks of empty homes going derelict while they are parcelled for larger developments. I truly think medium density in inner city communities will help build community where higher density can have side effects of hurting our established inner city communities that are being redeveloped. That being said, there is a place for higher density development, and area’s like the beltline and east village are good examples of where this works well. Overall, we all want great homes, connected communities, and wholistic living areas. To achieve this, the city needs to be directed to have more flexibility in it’s guidance to developers.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability and credibility is built on trust established through open and transparent communication. As councillor I will be consistent, reliable, present, and open to ideas and changes. I look forward to giving Ward 2 the opportunity to have leadership that sees the entire scope of situations, and will make difficult decisions. I will communicate the reasoning and thought process behinds my decisions, and I will be open to remove my own biases and review situations from a wholistic and people first lens.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: The processes need to be simple and understandable. As a city we need to embrace flexibility in how we develop with a firm focus on helping build connected communities. The more barriers that are created, the more expensive and less beneficial development comes. We don’t want a city that promotes development to support a bureaucracy, we want a city that guides developers to listen to the community needs and has the flexibility to build projects that fit that need. We want high quality homes, with a focus on supporting good builders and trades. We want consistency and need to remove ambiguity of processes. Overall the city needs to step back and ask what is best for Calgarians now, and how can we support that progress.
  • Name: Jennifer Wyness
  • Website: www.jenniferwyness.com
  • Email: jenniferwyness@gmail.com
  • Candidate for Ward: Ward 2
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

_______________

Ward 3

Ian McAnerin

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: The Harvest Hills Golf Course redevelopment is generally viewed negatively by the established community but brought in denser, more affordable homes. The homes themselves are good for Ward 3.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: The Harvest Hills Golf Course redevelopment is also considered a detriment due to how the greenspace was handled. People who bought homes backing out to a golf course saw a large loss in value with the redevelopment. A better approach would have been to build a high-quality replacement greenspace (not just a bike path) adjacent to those lots that maintained the value of that housing. This would have significantly lowered resident resistance and anger.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Most change is in the Livingston/Carrington area, where the development is greenfield. The one established area development that the community is generally looking forward to is the Green Line, which is years off. There is an opportunity to redevelop along the proposed Green Line path that, if done properly, would be welcomed by much of the community.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Early and effective community engagement. Please check out the \”Creating Coventry\” initiative for an excellent example of this that is working in our area, specifically their engagement process and style.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I believe CICBA has an important role to fill as advisors to City Hall. If elected, I intend to initiate a project to create a \”one-stop\” development portal for the city that removes the need for developers to deal with multiple departments (which often don\'t communicate with each other) on the front end. I did this successfully while consulting with the Canadian Government, an example being the CRA portal, which brings together several departments and ministries that taxpayers and companies used to have to navigate separately, with separate paperwork for each. As part of this process, I would welcome and value CICBA\'s input.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: It\'s always a problem when large entities have a voice so strong it drowns out smaller companies, intentional or not. I would welcome CICBA\'s input into matters affecting its members.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: To me, accountability means, to a large extent, open self-regulation and adherence to existing rules, combined with meaningful enforcement of the standards. Credibility to me means a combination of accountability (above), representation (having a large enough membership base to be statistically relevant), and promotion of best practices rather than minimum standards.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: I think simplifying the development process and getting rid of wasteful red tape would go a long way towards this. You shouldn\'t need a dedicated legal department just to get a development permit and related licenses.
  • Name: Ian McAnerin
  • Website: www.mcanerin.ca/
  • Email: ward3@mcanerin.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 3
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Nijjar Gurbir

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Give that Ward 3 is a suburban community having been developed relatively recently, we have seen limited redevelopment or gentrification in our communities. We have active greenfield development north of Stoney Trail. One recent example of redevelopment in the ward is a multi family project at the corner of Harvest Hills Blvd and Stoney Trail in the community of Panorama Hills. This project is providing higher density, more affordable rental units in an area that is primarily single family residential. These types of projects should be supported where they make sense.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Continuing the example above, adjacent property owners tend to oppose these these types of development given the higher density, changing nature of the lands around them and nuisance of construction. Traffic can also be of concern as you are concentrating more units in a smaller area. Another redevelopment project that has been considered detrimental to a community was the redevelopment of the Harvest Hills Golf Course. Residents had purchased homes that backed onto a golf course for it to be redeveloped to single and multi-family units. Density was gained but residents who bought along the golf course may experience a decline in their property values.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: None at this time.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: In my experience, the public generally does not feel adequately engaged when the land use is amended and the development permit is applied for. It is incumbent for a developer to conduct adequate public engagement to maximize exposure to the project and gain valuable feedback from the community.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: As mentioned above, it is typical for the larger developers to work more closely with the city. It is important for city hall to understand the position and merits of the smaller groups who develop in our inner cities. Generally, inner city projects are led by smaller groups given the smaller scale of these projects while the larger developers generally build at the perimeters (greenfield). It is a goal of the city to foster and redevelop our inner city where possible and feasible. It is important to understand the constraints to redevelopment and support initiatives that help these projects move forward.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I think it is important for small businesses to have a voice and lobby for their industry. Should I be elected, I commit to listening and engaging with small business owners and residents to best understand their needs and find solutions to support them where it makes sense.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: To me, accountability is the ability for one to speak and provide the rationale for their actions/decisions. It means to be transparent and stand behind the decisions you’ve made. Credibility is having the experience, knowledge and information to make an informed decision. It is important to have as much information and knowledge available to make a good decision on a project.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: It would be important for city council to be aware of the roll smaller builders play in the growth of our city and keep open communication. It is important for the city to streamline their processes and cut the red tape in moving these projects forward should they be in the best interest of the community and city.
  • Name: Gurbir Nijjar
  • Website: www.gurbirward3.ca
  • Email: gurbir@gurbirward3.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 3
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Kumar Sharma

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: I believe in redevelopment within the inter city does bring about positive outcome in that modern development such as infills occurs allowing for positive enhancement of the community, increasing yet modest density as per bylaws and increases the tax base. In addition a younger population brings a new sense of awareness and vitality to the community.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: A detriment to be considered is with single family residential areas where multi story rental units are considered on vacant lots which changes the dynamics of the community
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Only new development is occurring within the boundaries of Ward 3. This is welcomed for it provides new businesses to develop, boost school populations all positive. In addition to established neighbors in Ward 3, residents are fixing up their properties. Up grading ?
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Where changes is needed is to better build in advance the needed infrastructure , the core services of the City of Calgary ,roads and in note SCHOOLS prior to new housing for the development of communities Better pre-planning
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: NO: I do not believe the past Council is focused to small business and the cost of service and the amount of time needed to deal with City Administration and Regulatory Time tables. Remember how long it took City Council and Administration to understand what was occurring in the City Core downtown with layoffs?
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: Yes this is a issue . What is needed it TIME sensitive regulatory process offering transparency, accountability ESG policy and the leadership to enhance development and re development on a timely bases.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: As to the position of Councillor or any elected position is \”TO SERVE\” and TO SERVICE\” the needs of the residents with the passion to serve to be transparent, accountable and to listen to the voters.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: As City Administration discusses changes within the communities as to re development –I would recommend a joint session with Council as a whole to meet in a one day or two day session work shop to learn and to educate and meet the requirements of sustainability, accountability and transparency . This is leadership which is so needed at City Hall.
  • Name: Kumar Sharma
  • Website: www.kumarsharma.ca
  • Email: kumar@kumarsharma.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: Ward3
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

Brent Trenholm

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Livingston is an interesting community, as many people in the area like the area.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: With the sale and building of high density on the Harvest Hills golf course has interrupted the entire communities presence.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Livingston and Carrington
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: The area lacks many amenities and has limited access for bus services. As the area is in the development stage transportation for schools and those that use transportation to get to work or shop need immediate attention.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I do not believe council understands what is needed, only what they want. When council approves the DP for a community and then the parents need to send their kids to school in a taxi because there is no bus service, there is a planning problem that should have never allowed this to happen.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: The heart of a community is small business. The present council does not come across as being business friendly and this needs to change. There are a couple ways of doing this. the first one would be to listen to them. If this means there needs to be more meaning full meetings and strategy sessions than so be it. without business the city is sunk. BIA\'s can play a vital part in all this.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: I will start with credibility. Candidates or elected officials without a proven track record of creating results, yet talk about all the problems and offer no creditable solutions or take credit for everything lack credibility. It seems that it has become the norm. This needs to change. Accountability is a big word that for many is simply a buzz word, because they talk in circles, and do not listen to their electorate or answer direct questions thinking they fool people then blame someone else if something goes wrong. As a person you should be accountable for your actions, (cause and effect) especially if you are elected. many politicians ruin the credibility of others by their actions and poor choices.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: I have to be honest about this one in that I do not have the answer for this question. What I believe needs to happen is there needs to be better community communication, The city needs to change some planning habits as well. I believe in community based planning. If a smaller developer was to talk with a community before they enacted a plan they would get more buy in and less problems. These businesses also need to ask city officials hard questions and ask for an answer.
  • Name: Brent Trenholm
  • Website: www.btrentrenholm.ca
  • Email: brent.trenholm@shaw.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: Ward 3
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

_______________

Ward 5

Raj Dhaliwal

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Many of the communities of Ward 5 are new communities and will not be under redevelopment for some time. However Falconridge and Castleridge, the more established communities in Ward 5 present good opportunities for redevelopment. We must be mindful of opportunities to to enhance the public realm, to support affordable housing, to support alternative modes of transportation and increase ease of use of Transit. A good example of this are some of the projects that are soon to be underway in Inglewood, with RNDSQR.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Change can often be controversial. This often revolves common misconceptions around density or fear of change. Ideal outcomes and conflict resolution can come from thoughtful engagement and design.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: In rebuilding after the impacts of the June 13th Hail Storm, opportunities for building back better are possible. Various more established communities in Ward 5 such as Castleridge and Falconridge are also up-coming opportunities for reinvestment and redevelopment.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Some constituents have expressed frustration over lack of maintenance in newer communities. Better establishment of expectations and responsibility between the City and developers can and should be addressed from the outset to ensure well-maintained communities. Thoughtful roadway design is also critical and should be addressed in the planning stages of redevelopment. We need to integrate Transit-Oriented Development into our planning as well as design encouraging alternative modes of transportation.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: There is definitely a disconnect between the overall goals of the City, the needs of small and medium sized developers and builders, as well as the concerns of constituents. There is work do be done in ensuring better engagement with communities in addressing misconceptions about changes in their communities. There is work to be done to ensure that small and medium sized builders and developers are supported and partners in meeting the needs of Calgarians.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: If elected, I would be thrilled to spearhead conversations around how small and mid-size builders and developers in our City can be heard, shared best practices amongst each other and supported as we move towards more sustainable development and addressing the needs of communities.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: I see my role as councilor, if elected, as one of helping to facilitate better lines of communication and providing support for the builders and developers in our city to best meet the needs of our citizens and our communities. Fundamentally this is about building relationships which cannot be done without establishing trust. Being accountable to Calgarians of Ward 5 includes working with all partners to help meet their needs.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: The City can help streamline the permitting process, and address IT challenges, long wait times, and processing delays with the Planning Department. We can also enhance the engagement process and work to ensure communities understand the vital role that development and developers play in shaping our future.
  • Name: Raj Dhaliwal
  • Website: www.voteraj.ca
  • Email: info@voteraj.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 5
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

_______________

Ward 7

Matt Lalonde

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: The transformation of East Village is among the city\'s best examples of redevelopment creating a strong positive outcome for a community. By utilizing the unique nature of CMLC and tax-increment financing, a previously ignored or forgotten about corner of our center-city has been transformed into a vibrant and successful urban community. The development processes that led us here can act as blueprint for the redevelopment of other neglected brownfield sites, and can be a excellent way to implement inner-city densification without severely impacting existing neighborhood character. I personally moved to East Village three years ago as I wanted to support the new community.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: One of the developments most frequently brought up by communities is that of the Hub in Motel Village. It is a very tall residential tower with no respect for the surrounding community context, and features an asymmetric exterior design akin to a crooked barcode. It is a deeply unpopular eyesore for residents in the surrounding communities, and has damaged the trusting relationship between those community associations and the municipal government. Under my leadership, the building would not have been approved at that height or with that architectural design, and the project would instead be mandated to better engage with the community on a solution that works for everyone. These sorts of out-of-context and under-engaged projects are to be discouraged in the future.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: The Montgomery Main Street project has been warmly welcomed by a community that has long been neglected by the city of Calgary. Updated streetscapes and new residential and commercial development along the corridor have been met with overwhelming support and is already building the resiliency of the community. It was long overdue and is now much appreciated.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: In my conversations with community members in Sunnyside, a great many residents have been negatively impacted by the closure of Memorial Drive\'s eastbound lanes on specific days. Without the provision of alternate travel options or routes, traffic unwilling to sit in gridlock on the drive have rerouted themselves through streets in the community that are not designed for the increased volume. It has created traffic and safety issues for the community despite being billed as a project to improve public safety. Such a project should not have been pushed through without community engagement, and in the future such decisions must include meaningful conversation with neighboring residents.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I am a strong supporter of private enterprise and competition in the provision of affordable and market-rate housing within the City. It is my opinion that no government can understand the industry and business well enough to effectively manage its growth and operation. As Councillor, it will be my priority to remove barriers and red-tape to ensure that companies of all sizes have an equal playing field. I am always happy to meet with builders and developers to address specific concerns, but it is my belief that government should create a simple and fair business environment before stepping aside to let private industry work.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I do believe that it is an issue, and it is a core reason that I believe the municipal government must reduce the burdens and regulations levied on builders and developers. As Councillor, my door will always be open to the industry as I will strive to create an environment that is conducive to business. As such, I will be voting to reduce the red tape surrounding the industry and ensure that companies of all sizes are provided all the space they need to operate effectively.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Simply put, it means sticking to your word and sticking to your values. I am not a candidate that merely says they are pro-business, I am a candidate that will follow through and act for the benefit of our inner-city developers. I have been a strong advocate for development in the right places for the right reasons, and so long as community engagement is included in the process, I will help create an environment where business is a far simpler activity. As a candidate, it has always been critical to me to be honest with voters and members of the business community about my intentions, about who I am, and about what I believe in. My answers to those questions do not change from audience to audience, and I look forward to bringing that integrity to city council.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: I believe that a less regulated and simpler process is the best place to start in helping smaller builders and developers along in the process. I am a strong supporter of small business, and it will be my privilege to ensure that the city becomes a more welcoming business environment.
  • Name: Matt Lalonde
  • Website: www.mattward7.ca
  • Email: info@mattward7.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 7
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

Heather McRae

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: I can give you several! I live in a fourplex in West Hillhurst. It is beautifully constructed and contributes positively to the streetscape, with front porches and a beautiful tree in the small front yard. We have cultivated a strong friendship among the residents and enjoy sitting outside and greeting everyone that walks past.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: We have several examples of redevelopment where trees and other biodiversity are missing. Trees contribute significantly to the walkability of a community, keep us cool in heat events and help to absorb water in heavy rain. Trees, which are viable in our climate, should be incorporated into every redevelopment.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Yes! Hillhurst, Sunnyside & West Hillhurst are communities that, for the most part, embrace redevelopment. Tuxedo Park is desperate for redevelopment that will bring small businesses and vibrancy to the community. Montgomery residents are supportive of redevelopment, but concerned about affordability. Mount Pleasant residents are nervous about redevelopment and I think would be more enthusiastic with greater investment in biodiversity on redeveloped lots.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: There are clearly some communities in which SOME residents are leery of redevelopment: Briar Hill, Houndsfield Heights, University Heights and Rosedale are a few. Ward 7 is in desperate need of a Councillor who will meet with residents and talk about the benefits of redevelopment. Positive communication is critical. Again, I believe that biodiversity plays an important role in bringing residents around. Also, we need to focus on the benefits for the climate of redevelopment – better building envelopes reduce GHG emissions, etc.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: No – I do not believe that small & mid-size developers/builders are being well represented by our city and city processes. Everything seems to support large redevelopment projects. We need more development that is human scaled and I see mid-size developers/builders as important partners in this.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: Yes! This is an issue. Small business owners are critical to the health of Calgary\'s economy. I am very keen on consultation with a wide variety of stakeholders and have demonstrated this since announcing my campaign last October. I have reached out to stakeholders at every opportunity, including a reach out to CICBA board members last spring. Collaboration with all stakeholders is the best path forward for our city.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Returning calls & emails, pro-active communication and accountability for my decision making. I will provide a rationale for decisions that demonstrate the facts used to inform my decision and how it benefits Ward 7 and our city.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: We must leverage partnerships with organizations such as CICBA to provide education opportunities to your members. We are stronger together, I am collaborative by nature and look forward to demonstrating that after Oct 18.
  • Name: Heather McRae
  • Website: heather4ward7.ca
  • Email: heather@heather4ward7.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: Ward 7
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Erin Waite

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: This is such an interesting question because there are redevelopments that were eventually supported, if not initially. The low income and accessible housing along the 16th Avenue edge of Rosedale received favourable comments now from the immediate neighbours. Many, though, admit to resistance at first. With the desperate need for more accessible and affordable housing, this project outcome is encouraging.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: There are many stories in communities of a perception of 100% disapproval, yet a project going ahead without any accommodations. The difficulty with this is that the community is unlikely to forget and be receptive the next time. I also wonder about how residents moving into the unwelcome development can possibly be accepted into the community. This sets up the community for other negative consequences. Some of the strongest, negative reaction is when multiple projects occur in quick succession. Can City planning work with developers to prevent the extended time of construction when a number of projects in the same area end up on a similar timeline?
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Change is hard and it is likely true that no change or redevelopment has been 100% welcomed, throughout its entire process. Interestingly, there appears to be appetite for renewal of the North Hill mall site. Given the size of site involved, it\'s likely that eventual redevelopment could be proposed and received well. Time will tell!
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: This is an area of great interest to me. I have communications experience bringing different views and interests together and finding common ground. I look forward to the challenge of bringing people together to understand pending change, to gather their input and eventual support, and finding ways to bring as many people as possible to a place where they feel good about the project proposed. The added challenge is recognizing the time value of money and the cost to the builder of slowing the project for a lengthy consultation process. These competing and conflicting interests are the very challenge of redevelopment in the inner city. To improve how the community feels, there needs to be transparency and better understanding of the framework and regulations (complicated, I know) and also openness and transparency on roles and responsibilities. There is a common belief of abuses and special favours between developers and the City, which is a problem if we\'re going to get to a place where the community is more open to and comfortable with change.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: Every area of regulation has a greater impact on smaller businesses that can\'t have resources on staff to fulfill the administrative burden of regulations. As a non profit leader for the past 10 years, and previously a consultant to start-ups and small companies, I saw this over and over again. The trick is to address unnecessary processes but without compromising quality and safety. There is always opportunity to look specifically at smaller companies with a view to improving the understanding of specific issues for all stakeholders in those processes – including Council and City administration. However, the burdens can only be reduced so long as those reductions don\'t compromise the values of safety and quality.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: Again, this issue is seen in many sectors and it is sensible to have large company stakeholders and a separate group of small company stakeholders. There may be issues that are common to both, but there will also be distinctions that are best represented and voiced by individuals who experience those differences.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Building accountability and credibility through recognized quality work and good community relationships would serve Council, the City, communities and developers well. The umbrella group, CICBA, can consider carrying out the role for its members of setting standards, making membership dependent on meeting those standards, and with a real process of ensuring the standards are meaningful and monitored. Setting the standards, since we are talking about public accountability, should involve input from the members, members\' customers, and the City. Once established, holding the \'seal of approval\' could lead to a quicker process through some permitting, as an example, because the quality standard is known and proven. With credibility, customers may pay a premium to have a home built by a company that holds the seal. At the City and in communities, celebrating great design that uses smaller inner city lots well, would be advantageous for future projects.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: Perhaps with the 2021 municipal election with many new Councillors in place, there is an opportunity to create education on systems and processes that could be attended by new Councillors as well as by newer and/or smaller builders and developers. Creating this curriculum, if it doesn\'t exist, also has a cost and there would need to be discussion on how that cost will be manageable.
  • Name: Erin Waite
  • Website: erinwaite.ca
  • Email: erin@erinwaite.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 7
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Derek Williams

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: I am a firm believer that redevelopment and evolution of areas has positive impacts on our communities. The most obvious example is the East Village. Looking back, not many supported the project and many were skeptical, it has evolved into a gathering place where all Calgarians can come and meet at the rivers and should be a model for other cities and projects of that magnitude
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: I think the Richmond Green development is a prime example of where redevelopment has been discouraged. In an area where densification is already quite high, the plan to sell green space to develop can set a dangerous precedent.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: I think the community of Montgomery, where I live, has had a tremendous amount of redevelopment, and has seen lots of positive changes to the community. New businesses, younger families, parks being played at instead of being empty. The difference is vast from when I moved here 10 years ago, and It has been nothing but positive
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: with any new ideas and developments, you can not make everyone happy. I think if communities can retain some historic and character buildings and homes, more of the resistant would be encouraged to invest in their properties to keep them from being unchanged.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I would say the city does not make effective policy decisions in the best interest of small and medium size developers.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I would commit to listening and engaging with stakeholders of all sizes in the industry and gather as much data as possible before making any policy decisions that could have ramifications to small businesses and redevelopment of our communities
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability as a Councilor means that no matter the size of the entity, the age, color, creed of the constituent, that you take the time to listen, engage, and make the best possible decision based on facts, data, and community need. Credibility is only given when people trust that you will make the best decision for their community and act in a manner that is unmotivated by anything other than their best interest
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: this is something I am not acutely aware of, but I am willing to listen and learn from those whose voices want to be heard on the subject
  • Name: Derek Williams
  • Website: www.ward7derek.ca
  • Email: ward7derek@gmail.com
  • Candidate for Ward: 7
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

_______________

Ward 8

Paul Bergman 

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: There is a multi-unit project (RC-G) project at Richmond Road and 20th Ave SW which seems to be well placed in the community, with Parking available around it. There are many of these projects, and many communities embrace this sort of development.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: In some locations, RC-G and other forms of densification have moved too rapidly to be reasonable and sensitive to Community. Think about Marda Loop as an example in Ward 8. Specifically, there is a proposed 28 unit project, with 14 parking stalls, at the corner of 20 Ave and 22 Street SW, which is overbuilt considering it\'s location and the scale of the community.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Shaganappi Community and Rosscarrock are supportive of appropriate multifamily development. Shaganappi has recently shown support for a 4 story building in their area. Other areas include CFB Currie and Beltline, where there is little pushback against multifamily density being created. These areas are seeing positive outcomes from densification.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Most people I have met while knocking on doors believe that Marda Loop has been overbuilt, and is insensitive to the surrounding single/semi housing form. Both Traffic and safety have become major concerns for most people. Helping move traffic through the area, and slowing down the development of 6 storey buildings on 33rd Ave are two things most people agree as being a major concern.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I believe the City is very much a road block to effective re-development of the inner-city. One problem area is the large number of regulations and red-tape which this council has created over the last 10 years. Another are of concern is the lack of certainty for both Community Members, and Home Builders, as to were re-development can take place. The \'Guidebook\', and Planning Department who are pushing it, believe that density can go anywhere in the \'Established Areas\' of the City. As a result, Communities feel they have no say in where density can, and cannot, go in their Communities. As a result, neither Communities nor Builders have certainty, which results in them being in constant conflict with one another.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I know there has been tension between the large greenfield developers and the small inner city builders within the BILD Association. This has resulted in the creation of this Association (CICBA). This healthy development is good for the growth of our City. Having groups which can prevent different view points to the City\'s Planning and Development process helps us create a healthier, more diverse, and vibrant City. The ongoing evolution of our City is the responsibility of it\'s citizens. The City should continue their work to ensure that all voices are heard in the evolution of Calgary, but should not be involved with specific industry groups who are responsible for representing themselves.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability means we listen to our citizens as part of the process of re-development of the City. I do not believe that with the top down, ideologically driven \'Guidebook\' this is happening; in fact quite the opposite. I am interested in changing that. Credibility means that individuals have a track record of action, and success. Whether in business or government, that means getting things done that you say you will. My record of success over the past 20 years of making payroll and creating projects is exemplary. I believe I have the credibility to have earned the trust of Ward 8 citizens.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: This question requires a two part answer. Firstly, Builders must be willing to learn and commit to being a high quality Builder. While that is true for the members of CICBA, there are many more builders who will not participate in any Association, and as a result, will often bring ill-repute to the industry as a result of being uniformed and unprofessional. The second part to the answer is the City must make their process and organization more accountable and transparent to it\'s citizens. The Planning and Development department at the City is often seen as a \'black-hole\', in the sense that there is no clear understanding as to who is doing what with the applications and queries that are submitted to the City. For the betterment of our City, this must change.
  • Name: Paul Bergmann
  • Website: www.bergmann4ward8.ca
  • Email: info@bergmann4ward8.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 8
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

Gary Bobrovitz

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: There are too many positive redevelopments to choose from. Let me instead provide you my redevelopment perspective and strategy going forward for the inner city and Ward 8. A positive development is a project that goes in the right location in any inner-city community. For example, 17th Ave SW is the right location where there already has been some densification. We need to understand that when development works it sustains Calgary going forward and enables young families to locate in the inner city and Ward 8 where they can help grow communities. The Municipal Development Plan has established 50-50 growth patterns. We must find the balance to grow out as well as grow in particularly with a strategy of building the inner city affordably. Most inner city Calgarians want to their children to live close by. Highway 22x is not close by. I have personally lived inner city in Cliff Bungalow for more than 43 years and I love the liveability and the amenities. I want my adult children to share in that quality lifestyle. They came into this world as Calgary inner city kids who were born and raised in Cliff Bungalow. They want to continue to live inner city. But the market is pricing them out so they can only purchase a home 1 ½ hours away from me and from their original childhood neighbourhood. This is unacceptable. Cutting red tape is one of the keys to reducing rising fees and costs that unfairly burden developers and add significantly to house prices. I pledge as the Ward 8 Councillor to cut red tape and push for transparency in the development and planning process at City Hall.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Rather than indulge in criticizing a project or development group let me provide you my redevelopment perspective and strategy going forward for the inner city and ward 8. A detrimental development is one that goes in the wrong location in any inner-city community. An inner road in Elbow Park or an inner road in Altadore would be the wrong location. We need to be sensitive to the area and know that without some development Calgary will fail. Richmond Park project is an example of irresponsible development that was staunchly opposed by strong voices in the surrounding communities. There could have been better consultation and a compromise achieved if there had been a definitive commitment to keep the capital from the green space sale in the immediate communities to revitalize them. As the Ward 8 Councillor I will have an open mind without any agenda or ideology. I am committed to working with both Developers and with communities to facilitate collaboration and engagement that produces positive and equitable outcomes for both groups. Let’s grow the inner city to encourage young families and make lives better.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: 17th Ave SW redevelopment is robust and positive as are parts of Shaganappi, Killarney and Altadore. My contact with those communities at the door during this election campaign indicate the residents and the C.A.s welcome these projects and are looking forward to their benefits.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Marda Loop is an area where there is disturbance among residents who believe the projects are not beneficial for the community. These concerns include increased traffic, reduced parking and more noise. In my opinion these conflicts did not need to happen. There could have been better communication and collaboration between a very small number of developers and the community. If these developers had been more sensitive and patient there could have been better outcomes for both parties. Now, there is substantial distrust and skepticism. If I become the Ward 8 Councillor, I will work very hard to build a consensus and reduce the friction so that there can be a win-win outcome that sustains development and still meets the needs and concerns of the residents.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I do not believe that Council or the City fully understand the industry and the business as it relates to small and mid-sized developers/builders. The industry needs to have a seat at the table. The industry needs a bigger voice. As the Ward 8 Councillor I will work to provide better representation and a bigger and more effective voice for the small to mid-sized developers/builders.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I will be a facilitator between the industry and the City Administration. I will also work hard to ensure City Council and the new Mayor are listening and provide equal opportunity to ALL developers not just a handful of “Insiders” who have dominated the process and received a disproportionate number of approvals. There are plenty of good projects that never receive a fair hearing. I will do my best to stop that inequity and ensure there is fairness and balance.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability and credibility are simple concepts. For me as a Council Candidate I believe that means: 1-Transparency 2-Balance 3-Honesty 4-Fairness
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: If I am elected, I will spearhead an initiative that formalizes Council and City Administration along with the Industry to hold a series of collaboration events where all parties can discuss the often confusing and complicated system/process that confront builders/developers and lead to misunderstanding with Administration. This could involve off site gatherings where the Administration can provide detailed and comprehensive information sessions. Then the Industry can provide detailed and comprehensive information sessions. In this way both groups can achieve a better understanding of the system/process. I pledge to facilitate the establishment of new trust and commitment from both sides to achieve better outcomes for everyone.
  • Name: Gary Bobrovitz
  • Website: garybobrovitz.ca
  • Email: info@garybobrovitz.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 8
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

Courtney Walcott

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Commercially, we are seeing the redevelopment of spaces for our local businesses all over offering a vibrancy that is felt throughout the community. For example, the new location of Our Daily Brett and it\'s partner shop NHBR coffee in Altadore are wonderful additions to the communities they are in. They become local hubs and anchors for the surrounding neighbourhoods that is so important to maintaining and expanding the local culture. Residentially, the continued development of row housing, duplexes, and other multi-family dwellings are wonderful additions to Calgary as they offer the type of mixed community necessary for our sustained prosperity. An example of this would be Garrison Woods. This neighbourhood, designed to be a true combination of housing forms was completely redeveloped and designed with a more universal, mixed income, dense living environment filled with walking paths, small parks, and a thriving community where people can get around any way they choose. The ability to design a space like that started with a commitment to what type of housing will exist in that space. By offering the diversity of housing seen in Garrison, you end up with true flexibility in community design.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: On the corner of 21st Street and 32nd Ave SW, there is a proposal that went to appeal to put in 8 rowhouses on a single large plot each with a secondary suite. This development went to the appeal board and won. However, another process was begun to establish direct control over the land in order to push the development through. This redevelopment of the space is less so a conversation on the development itself, but on how the determination to see it built has diluted the communities trust in the process. The affected neighbours were willing to accept the density in their neighbourhoods until they found out that the number of residences on this one lot was doubling. The community followed the process, won the appeal, but are now facing another battle as the development continues to push for approval.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: The communities of Shaganappi and Altadore are perfect examples of neighbourhoods that welcomed redevelopment and are experiencing the benefits. Shagannappi is a relatively small community, however, they have continually been open to redevelopment as it is understood that this increased investment will only benefit the overall quality of the neighbourhood. Especially in the inner city many homes were built over 50 years ago, some even more, so redevelopment is a welcome sight to support rotational investments in the community. Redevelopment also supports an increase in housing diversity, more efficient homes, and an overall increase in housing quality. Altadore is similiar to Shagganappi but on a much larger scale. As one of the biggest and the most dense communities in Ward 8, it has seen continued development over the years which has brought a vibrancy to this community, kept the population levels stable, and has supported continued use of the local amenities. Other great examples of development that has been seen as a huge opportunity for the community is the long planned development of Currie Barracks to bring more life to that area of the city.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: I wouldn\'t go so far as to say substantial, but my time knocking doors has led me to get a lot of feedback from residents of South Calgary (Marda Loop) on the development that has taken place along 33rd Ave and 34th Ave. In particular, development of row houses, duplexes, and apartments are quickly outpacing public realm improvements by the City. The end result is a strong distaste toward the increased traffic, the lack of parking, the constant construction, and a lack of access to the local amenities. While the development itself is not the problem in whole, the City has failed to work with the community to understand the necessity of this development in addition to investing in these local communities the necessary upgrades to the infrastructure and amenities to support these new residents and developments. The solution seems clear that the City must support collaborative development processes while simultaneously taking a more active role in ensuring that neighbourhoods that take on development see the necessary public infrastructure upgrade to mitigate the impacts of a changing demographic. For example, traffic calming measures should be further implemented along 33rd and the intersecting roadways to better manage traffic flow without taking away access to the local businesses along the mainstreet.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I do not believe every member of Council has a good understanding of your industry and business. It can be seen in the type of questions that some councillors raise that are often short sighted, or clearly based in a misunderstanding of the intentions of development across Calgary. These instances are not universal, but common enough that it is worth commenting on. However, what I will say is that I do believe there is enough information available, either through the development processes or the administration team at the City, to provide the information necessary to Councillors to make effective decisions that facilitate sensible development and redevelopment. What would likely go a long way is a more equitable process for ensuring small and mid-size developers have an opportunity for their voice to be heard in the development of city policy and procedures, or the updates of said policy and procedures.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: Equity in all things will always be an issue. It is important, especially when looking at smaller, more local businesses being given the opportunity to sit at the table and provide input on par with their larger counterparts. Much like my proposal for public engagement, an equitable engagement process where the most affected by a policy change are valued over those more prevalent voices who may be in a more privileged position to engage in City building, but ultimately less affected.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability to me is an acute understanding of what areas are in my control and power, and to what degree I acknowledge my own responsibility for the events in those areas. If we can live in a world we people recognize their own power, we will more quickly feel the weight of our decisions having know the impact of it across society. Too often I see people feign ignorance to the effects of their choices, and thus shirk accountability. But the moment we recognize what is in our power, we must then acknowledge our own responsibility for either positive or negative outcomes. This accountability will increase our care in decision making, our compassion for people, and our understanding of the strength we carry in positions of leadership, policy makers, and city builders. When we do that, then we can be trusted and credible.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: For more than just small builder/developers, the City needs to engage in a program to support any small business and entrepreneur in developing the skills and tools necessary to navigate the system. Our system is complex by design, and thus, it is our responsibility to help people find success in that complexity. As an educator, I believe that for people to find success in the systems we create, we must provide them the tools to navigate it.
  • Name: Courtney Walcott
  • Website: www.courtneywalcott.com
  • Email: info@courtneywalcott.com
  • Candidate for Ward: 8
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

_______________

Ward 9

Gian-Carlo Carra

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: My entire 20+ year career as an urban design professional, community activist, and East Calgary-based academic researcher has been based on the simple ideas that: 1) neighbourhood change is inevitable; 2) densification, when delivered as urbanism (walkable, transit-supported, mixed use), as opposed to suburbanism (car dependant, segregated uses), is a benefit to communities; and, 3) ideally municipal government should play the role of convener and facilitator of conversations amongst citizens, industry, and stakeholders to solve the majority of “where and how” questions regarding neighbourhood change/densification before the clock starts ticking on individual redevelopment projects (because time is money). I’m very proud of the Guidebook and the LAP processes as the outcome of this advocacy and I’m seeking re-election to firmly stand in support of this work in the face of stiff political opposition. I’m also seeking another term to ensure that integration of the land use bylaw is delivered as a critical component of this transformed planning system. The two examples of positive community change/densification that I can proudly point to from my time leading Ward 9 is the evolution of Inglewood’s Main Street and the restart of Bridgeland-Riverside’s The Bridges.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: At public hearings I have consistently opposed densification in areas where the car dependency implications and subsequent downstream costs to our roads network outweigh the role densification must play in supporting existing and emerging neighbourhood-based walkable destinations and increased transit ridership. A specific example would be my opposition to a midrise development proposed in Ward 1 along Nose Hill Drive on the south side of Scenic Acres and Silver Springs (it was the middle of nowhere from a walkability perspective). On the other side of the spectrum, I have opposed redevelopment when the density was too low for the area. A specific example was my opposition to a cottage cluster proposed by Homes for Heroes in East Riverside (a block from the Bridgeland-Riverside LRT station). I was pleased to work with Homes for Heroes to find them their home in Forest Lawn at the corner of 36 ST and 8 AV SE.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: I was elected to City Council in 2010 based on 10 years of community-based work in Inglewood and Greater Forest Lawn that sought municipal reinvestment in return for thoughtful community-supported densification. Inglewood’s current community leadership is oppositional to these objectives but there has been considerable public investment plus upzoning approved by council despite that opposition. Bridgeland is very pro-density although there is a live conversation about protecting the single detached character (although not necessarily the single-family functionality) of some parts of the community. Renfrew is experiencing some opposition to the North Hill Local Area Plan although there is also support (the CA supported the plan until the political heat got too intense). The Communities of Greater Forest Lawn accepted considerable City-led upzoning in return for the rebuild of International Avenue (which was my master’s thesis). Ogden is just beginning to grapple with its position on the inevitable redevelopment pressures that the GreenLine will bring (although there is broad community consensus surrounding the emergence of Ogden Road as the Main Street it was historically intended to become). And Manchester is awaiting a triple-mix renaissance that is being heralded by the craft brewing industry that has sprung up in the Barley Belt. On the whole, I am seeking reelection because I’ve dedicated the last 20 years to community-based transformation of the City’s planning function from greenfield-focused to redevelopment-focused. This work is incomplete and now heavily contested by a populist politics of anger, fear, and division that are dominating the discourse these days. Our neighbourhoods’ and our city’s best future lies in winning this struggle, in growing sustainably upwards, in building mixed use neighbourhoods that nurture a diversified economy and cultural vibrancy and spectacular parks and recreation opportunities, and in getting out of our cars and walking, wheeling, and riding transit.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: At the point of transformation that we’re at, there are very few grumbles about work that’s actually been delivered – despite inevitable opposition that had occurred through the entitlement process. In fact, there’s mostly appreciation for the outcomes. There are big concerns with projects that have been granted land use but in which there are questions about how the DP will land. There are also problems with DPs that have been approved but which have yet to be built. But mostly there are problems with “the process” which generally reflects a fear of change and specifically can be attributed to the communication issues that exist when onboarding a diverse public at different and ongoing points in the process. I strongly believe that unless a proposed project is sizable and contains multiple lots requiring subdivision, a mix of buildings, and new streets and greenspaces, the onus for engaging the public should not be on the developer, and in fact the engagement should have already been undertaken during the LAP. For these reasons I support: 1) proactive Local Area Planning; and, 2) representative community-based leadership tasked and resourced with the mission to broker the tough conversations and arrive at thoughtful move-forward positions regarding neighbourhood change. I believe that with regard to the former, the Guide for Local Area Planning and the LAP process has gotten us much of the way there (although there are still communication improvements that need to be made to better engage and inform the general public). With regard to the latter, we have a lot of work to do and one of the reasons I’m seeking reelection is to deliver a model of such representation in the Communities of Greater Forest Lawn through funding that’s been secured (but not used on account of covid) from the Council Innovation Fund.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I believe we’re finally getting to a place where our redevelopment sector is set up to compete with our well established, and larger-player dominated greenfield sector – but we’re not there yet. Step one was getting greenfield development to reflect its actual costs and to move public money from subsidization of to investment in greenfield growth. Step two is getting our redevelopment system fully online – publicly supported LAPs, public investment + a workable levy system, a streamlined and integrated land use bylaw, and expedited approvals processes. Step three is integrating the two systems so the discussion is about growth in general and we’re able to make apples to apples decisions about where limited public dollars are invested. The challenge is that while the city’s best future lies in considerably more redevelopment than greenfield development, we have yet to achieve step two. Politically the majority of Council represents suburban interests and does not understand redevelopment as part of their day-to-day work in community. Additionally, public opposition to neighbourhood change is rising, spurred by local fears regarding change, as well as by well organized campaigns to exploit that fear. The fact that the Guidebook for Great Communities was so contested by Council after years of support and work towards that outcome shows that there is a lot of work to be done still in educating both Council as well as the community as to the importance of redevelopment to achieving our best future.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: Yes and yes. I believe we have a great working relationship right now between the redevelopment industry and the team from the city who are tasked with developing a workable redevelopment-focused system. I believe the biggest current challenge is political and that’s why this election is so important.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: As an eleven-year member of Calgary City Council I pride myself on having a well defined strategic plan – called Great Neighbourhoods – that I use to guide my decision-making and advocacy and that frames my communications with constituents, administration, and industry. This election I’m evolving my platform and running under the banner of Rise Together. Rise Together is based on the idea that this election will determine Calgary’s fate in a very profound way – will we decline or will we rise? – and leads with the value propositions of Equity, Climate Action, and Democracy and Dialogue as the essential ingredients of our beloved city rising into its best future. Great Neighbourhoods remains as the five-point best-practice transformation of how City Hall is structured to facilitate a better city. An, after over six years of responding to the downturn by grinding the cost of our municipal government downwards (while largely protecting front line services), we have reached an inflection point. There are very few efficiencies remaining to be wrought and the process of building towards our best future, which we\'ve started with one-time savings, must be bolstered with dedicated, year-over-year funds that appear on our municipal tax bills and transparently communicate the contribution every tax dollar is making. The five funds I’m proposing are: 1) Downtown Reinvention 2) Main Streets and Transit Oriented Development 3) Accessibility, Livable Streets, and Active Modes – the A5 Network 4) Parks, Recreation, and Culture 5) Community Safety Investment Framework – an antiracist, 24/7 alternative emergency response. At its most essential, accountability and credibility means being very clear about what you’re proposing to do, why you’re proposing to do it, and remaining always available to constituents and stakeholders in the ongoing dialogue between intention, process, and outcome.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: I believe the transformed planning system we’re working towards which, in its end state will be characterized by evergreen Local Area Plans overseen by locally situated, interdisciplinary teams of civil servants, and inclusive community-based governance structures (including residents, businesses, and institutional actors), is our best hope towards an environment where the community, the city, and builders are all on the same page and working together towards great neighbourhood change. Anything we can do to educate everyone about where we’re going, and to build the political will to get there as soon as possible is the mission. Electing a Council that is dedicated to this outcome is step one.
  • Name: Gian-Carlo Carra
  • Website: www.carra4ward9.ca
  • Email: info@carra4ward9.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 9
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

_______________

Ward 11

Kourtney Branagan

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: The London Towers on Horton Road was a catalyst for change in that area (although we could argue the unfinished site is a detriment). However, the pedestrian bridge connection to Heritage station and the improved sidewalk up the hill towards retail was a major benefit. This addition led to another developer looking at a site targeting seniors because of the increased mobility in the area. I think when development can support improved public realm to/from multiple key sites and supports mobility in the neighbourhood generally, it is a bonus for Calgarians.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: I don\'t think Kingsland Junction is a detriment to the community, however, there was a loss of green space and due to city policy the land value went into a general pot for the city versus a financial investment back into the specific neighbourhood tom improve an existing green space. This is more a critique of city policy than the specific development. However, I would like to see builders/developers advocating for the return to the immediate community as best possible. I say this believing that if developers can advocate for neighbourhood reinvestment, communities are more likely to be accepting of changes.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: Many of the communities in Ward 11 are eager to work with developers on un or under-developed sites. This includes Haysboro, Kingsland, Southwood, Acadia, Fairview, and Windsor Park. The Heritiage communities Local Area Plan group is also looking at how change and redevelopment can happen in their communities and what improvements this can bring to neighbourhoods. Neighbourhoods to the west, in particular Cedarbrae and Braeside are also very curious about the Local Area Plan process and how that could be of benefit to their neighbourhoods. North Glenmore continues to take on multi-family housing on the north side of Glenmore and it feels generally well accepted. That part of the community needs sidewalk upgrades, especially curb cuts.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: I believe the Co-Pp redevelopment in Oakridge has been controversial as to its benefits. Unfortunately in this case, I don\'t believe the current leadership in Ward 11 helped the community understand the benefits the development could bring to the area with regards to aging in place, a better retail experience, and overall better land-use. I think that is improved when leadership encourages people to come to the table with an open and accepting minds rather than a mindset of anti-change. I think early communication with the community is key, as neutral or positive as possible.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I think the challenge is that through the planning process, talk of costs cannot be part of applications. I believe there could be better interaction with small/medium builders around the application process so that time and money is saved on both sides. I believe the city is willing to work on this and wants to spend less time reviewing applications and permits, hence the guidebook and local area plans, as well as ongoing work for established communities and how to incent development in those areas. I would like to see more small developers be part of those conversations.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I think if there is committee work around established neighbourhood redevelopments, those involved in that process need to be at the table. This should include developers at a range of scale, trades, community, and other parties who partake in redevelopment. I will need to look more into committee composition and the mandates for participation, and how participants become involved. As a past committee member from the community level, I wasn\'t always certain the development industry was comprehensively represented.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: It means not making promises I can\'t fulfill. Using accurate and appropriate language when discussing topics/issues. Seeking to understand the issue and getting clarification when needed. Asking for help and advice when needed.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: Without understanding what is and isn\'t working right now, I am hesitant to offer too many suggestions on improvement. That said, I think understanding the challenges is the first place to start. It get the sense as though there might be a gap in understanding how to get started working with the city for approvals and permits. I\'m not sure if a guide exists (eg downloadable pdf). Perhaps also info sessions quarterly with interested parties to better understand the process. I also wonder if there is opportunity for a mentor program within small/medium developers to help newer groups get started and trouble shoot early challenges.
  • Name: Kourtney Branagan
  • Website: kourtneybranagan.ca
  • Email: hello@co11aborate.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 11
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No

Lauren Herschel

Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Ward 11 as a whole has gone through very little redevelopment although I expect that to change in the next 3-5 years. However two areas have seen some – Windsor Park and North Glenmore park. I think in both cases it has added a diversity in housing styles that didn’t exist previously. In Windsor Park there have also been mixed use and a commercial development added at Elbow Dr and 50th that has created a great community “centre” or main street with a variety of popular amenities for surrounding community residents. I am hopeful we will start to see more redevelopment in Ward 11 – both purely residential and mixed use (like the Oakridge Calgary Co-op project that is finally underway).

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: I think some communities feel they’ve had more of their fair share of density addition (Windsor Park) but I can’t point to a specific project that I feel or I’ve heard was a detriment. I know residents were concerned about parking with the addition of the mixed use projects at Elbow/50th but most residents I have spoken to said it is a non-issue now. I think the fear of the unknown, and the occasional perception that there was a lack of community engagement has led some residents (even in areas without redevelopment) to have a negative view of redevelopment, without there actually being negative impacts in reality. I think moving forward though it will be important that those fears are addressed by developers and the City to facilitate future projects.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: The Oakridge Calgary Co-op project redevelopment is underway. It is the first redevelopment the four surrounding communities have seen. Initially there was resistance (in part because of misinformation being spread) but now the reception of the project is more one of excitement. It will bring the area more housing options. We currently don’t have many options for seniors or almost seniors who don’t want their larger homes anymore but want to stay in the area (age in community). This project will address that, along with providing extra services, retail and restaurants not currently found in the neighbourhood. We are also starting to see redevelopment in Kingsland where old bungalows are being replaced with Duplex or Fourplex, which again is adding housing choice that doesn’t exist as much as it could. Lake view is also seeing a number of older homes be replaced with new single family homes – I don’t think the community is looking forward to more of that specifically but they also aren’t overly concerned about it.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: As mentioned, we haven’t seen a lot yet. I think going forward, the key will be having good engagement with the CA’s, residents and other stakeholders. Sometimes engagement is inconsistent or the information is lacking, which leads to mistrust and a larger swath of the community being concerned. In my experience, with thorough and meaningful engagement, developments become far less contentious. I think developers and the City both play a role in this.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: No. Council still has a number of members who don’t have a grasp of basic planning principles, costs and zoning. I don’t think there is an understanding or awareness in terms of how much time delays, application changes etc. cost, including opportunity costs. With admin, I feel some really get it, but aren’t empowered to do anything to make improvements. I think if there was greater understanding, we’d be able to better meet our established area density/growth targets, which we aren’t currently doing. While there are some companies that seem to have no issue in getting approvals, I think that the process lacks consistency and predictability which creates issues, especially for smaller builders/developers
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I think all areas of the building industry need to feel like they have a voice. Given the fact that we have these established area targets and the City frequently states it’s desire for more inner city growth, I think it’s critical that the businesses who do the most work in that space have a seat at the table (small and mid-sized established area builders). If elected I would find out what you feel is lacking, and work with you to figure out the best way to have your voices heard. That might mean adjusting meeting or committee times so more of the smaller builders can attend (evenings? Early mornings?). If you want to hear from and include any underrepresented group, you need to meet them where they are and find a way to make it work for everyone even if that means a different engagement model. I would also highlight to the rest of council how the City is possibly creating roadblocks to their own goals with policy that negatively affects small to medium sized businesses in the industry.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: Accountability is one of the pillars of my platform – it is very important to me. It means being a person of my word, it means listening and having open conversations with stakeholders. We are not always going to agree but we need to be respectful, professional and open to compromise. For the city to move forward in a positive way, we need to restore trust and relationships, particularly with industry. That requires transparency, and the willingness to have tough conversations to work towards solutions. At the end of the day, as a councillor it is my job to represent residents and businesses – not my own interests.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: As a start I’d probably ask this question of you, as you know best what you are lacking. That said, I would like to see community engagement best practices established as a guideline for developers and builders, to create more consistency. I would also like to see “do at your own pace” online learning modules or videos on key policy issues that directly impact the day to day of established area small and medium sized developers/builders. Occasional workshops and seminars, particularly if there is a change in process or policy could also work. Finally I’d like all builders/developers to have the opportunity to fill out a report card on how the City is doing, once or twice a year that then could inform changes to fees, process and policy.
  • Name: Lauren Herschel
  • Website: www.laurenherschel.ca/
  • Email: Hello@laurenherschel.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 11
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

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Ward 12

Teresa Hargreaves

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: Ward 12 is a young newer community where we have not yet expereinced the redevlopment. We do work with our developers to create safe family friendly commuities. We have also started more farm to table and bee programs within our ward.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: As noted above we are still growin and a young ward. The biggest thing is lack of transit in our area.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: None
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: Too much traffic do to the lack of transit.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: No. I feel that the city engages with the larger developers and overlooks the small business owners. Not just development but small businesses in general.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: As a Landman and Project Manager, communicaiton is 90% of my job. We need all voices and thoughts heard, so that we can create a better more vibrant city.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: This is important as we are representing the city and our wards. People want to see the work getting done and finally having a partner at the table.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: We need to create more stakeholder engagment processes and bid processes for all.
  • Name: Teresa Hargreaves
  • Website: teresaforward12.ca
  • Email: teresaforward12@gmail.com
  • Candidate for Ward: 12
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

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Ward 13

Jay Unsworth

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: I believe that the redevelopment of existing infrastructure, and not rampant outward growth, is best for Calgary and its communities. The days of unbridled new development must stop, and smart and sustainable development must begin. There are some recent examples of positive redevelopment projects in Calgary. I would choose the continuing redevelopments in the East Village and University District as good examples of large-scale redevelopments that embrace the roots, community, purposes, and users of their locations. I strongly believe that change can be achieved on a smaller scale. The ContainR redevelopment in Sunnyside and General Block redevelopment project in Bridgeland are great examples of specific interventions that dramatically improved the character of the surrounding community, while celebrating existing structures and history. The difference in vibrancy in and around Murdoch Park, before and after the opening of General Block, is night and day. I also believe that corner stores and other small, independent businesses, combined with innovative living spaces for a variety of audiences, should be incorporated into neighborhoods and encouraged through relaxed zoning. These changes can be easily integrated into existing communities and are prime examples of redevelopment that create positive, vibrant neighbourhoods.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Unfortunately, Calgary has a few examples of redevelopment that didn’t achieve the outcome desired. I want to focus on the Eau Claire market, which is being redeveloped yet again. The Eau Claire area of downtown has been developed and redeveloped many times over the years, with the last attempt happening in the 1990s. The plan was to create a Granville Island style festival market that would anchor the north end of downtown. This redevelopment would inspire a wave of development all through downtown. The market opened to much fanfare in 1993 and a $43-million dollar price tag. The design of the market worked against itself, and it never really incorporated itself into the adjacent community. The actual building never became the destination site it aimed to be. It was also not connected to the plus 15 system in the rest of the downtown, and parking was limited and costly. Now we are redeveloping the area with hopes of better outcomes. The plan is to refresh the area to make it more of a year-round destination for visitors and more accessible and flexible for residents. I hope that that is successful.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: I want to focus on two redevelopments in Ward 13. The first is the Telsec Development across from the Shawnessy LRT Station. I like the dense, transit oriented development and believe that the first-floor retail space will create a vibrant area that people want to go to and use. In the long run, this redevelopment should bring more affordable housing options into the area while bolstering a community transit hub and creating new retail options for the community. The only drawback that I see would be the amount of surface parking given its proximity to transit and a massive surplus of nearby parking. This is especially odd when you consider council removed non-residential parking requirements, which is what the parking appears to be purposed for. The second redevelopment is the Bridlewood Affordable Housing Project. One of the core pillars of my campaign is making Calgary affordable for all Canadians. This project is relatively dense, climate friendly, and aesthetically-pleasing. It focuses on walkability in that area of the community and has an abundance of amenities with close proximity to schools. The transit connectivity of the project could be better; however, 162 Ave SW is slated for a future BRT line. Reception to that project has been good, as it fits well within the existing topology of the community (near townhouses / condo blocks and the larger commercial hub) and as a result the project wasn\'t prone to the NIMBY push pack you often see with affordable housing projects.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: One example of a mixed reaction to a redevelopment is the Redevelopment of Shawnee Slopes. The redevelopment of Shawnee Slopes is split into two parts, the Fish Creek Exchange and Shawnee Park. I think the Fish Creek Exchange is beneficial due to it being mixed-use and transit-oriented, as the density and associated amenities will bring some vibrancy to the community. On the other hand, the Shawnee Park aspect of the redevelopment is uninspiring and descends into cookie-cutter suburbia far too quickly given its proximity to the LRT station. This is an especially poor tradeoff given that Shawnee Slopes used to be a golf course and one of the main amenities for the surrounding communities. There\'s a playground and landscaped stormwater pound, but nothing extraordinary compared to the rest of Shawnessy/ Millrise. Townhomes and other multi-family dwellings paired with an expansive public park and/or plaza would have been more fitting for the area and given back more to the community.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I have travelled the world, and the most vibrant, inclusive, and enjoyable cities have embraced new ways of thinking about development, building communities, and celebrating their unique differentiators, and they bring experts from many sectors to the table to re-imagine and build their cities. They don’t bog small and medium business owners and developers down with unnecessary red-tape and costs, or old ways of thinking. I look forward to working with forward-thinking organizations like CICBA in developing a smart, innovative, sustainable development sector in Calgary, establishing us as a leader in the global development sector. As it stands now, I think that City Hall tries to understand the development industry, but doesn’t engage experts in that industry when big decisions about process, zoning, and innovative ideas are made. I think that overall, the City administration is supportive of redevelopment in theory, but is far more supportive of traditional development because it is simply easier for them to just spread out to new land, as opposed to creatively re-imagine what we already have. You need look no further than the campaign donation lists of City Councilors to see the way traditional development continues unabated. Unfortunately because I am outspoken about the need for innovative and sustainable re-development, I am not supported by some of the large development organizations, as they fear I may put up roadblocks to their continued perceived “free-reign\'\' at City Hall. The City of Calgary has tried to set a different path with the Guidebook for Great Communities. I thought it was a good attempt to streamline the development of Local Area Plans which simplifies the process for changes to lot-specific zoning and to make infill and multi-use development easier for smaller developers. I feel that this is representative of another current issue that needs to be addressed – weak leadership, lack of accessibility to Council members, and opaque transparency around what is happening and being decided at City Hall. In regards to the controversy surrounding the Guidebook for Communities, our current Ward 13 Councilor, Diane Colley-Urquhart, did not have the courtesy to communicate anything to her constituents in the months and years before the Guidebook went to Council for approval. I sat through her virtual town hall meeting last winter and this subject was not raised. If citizens had had an opportunity to learn more about this and provide input earlier, they would have likely been much more supportive of the final plan. We need to have more conversations and more transparency if we want positive change to come. I think that industry, communities, and the City must work together to revamp the zoning process across the city. Zoning reform would allow for more varied and equitable housing options. Some commercial services and amenities must be within walking or riding distance. Recreational and entertainment must also be close by. We also must protect natural areas and encourage biodiversity where possible. I also feel that the city’s new R-CG (Residential – Grade-Oriented Infill) District zoning distinction shows that the city is addressing the needs of a wider range of developers. This distinction will allow developers to build low density row houses in developed neighborhoods, leading to schools remaining open and businesses thriving.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I might sound like a broken record but the whole development process needs to be much more inclusive and transparent. We must bring the right people to the table, and have more open conversations about how to make the city better for all Calgarians. The development process must be more competitive and serve all developers and citizens. We do need more community engagement, but not never-ending community engagement. The developers must continue to work with communities. The City of Calgary must continue to take on and support healthy community engagement, as a lot of infill development faces intense NIMBY opposition which I\'m sure is a burden for smaller developers. The City must act to ensure that timelines and deadlines are met, rather than indefinite timelines and constantly re-addressing decisions already made.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: I whole-heartedly believe in accountability. Accountability is one of the three pillars of my campaign, and ensuring City Council is accountable is one of the reasons that I am running. Our elected representatives should be showing up to all council meetings prepared and ready to have open and transparent discussions based on what their constituents want, not necessarily pandering to the vocal minority, or their donor list. I believe Councillors should govern, and leave operations up to hired professionals; just because you’re an elected official doesn’t mean you’re an expert. This is another reason I feel I’m fully qualified for this position as my resume positions me better than most to help govern our city. To be credible, a leader needs to be competent, truthful, and compassionate. This is especially important for politicians and their constituents. They need to have the necessary skills and knowledge to govern for all. I believe that my work experience in business operations in billion-dollar institutions and leadership on several large-scale building projects with multiple developers, funders, contractors and other key stakeholders, gives me credibility. I believe that my graduate school education in business and post graduate education in non-profit management gives me credibility in understanding all sectors and how to collaborate. Accountability and integrity is at the core of all that I do – I can’t be any other way – and I do believe that I am the only candidate in Ward 13 who can truly state that.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: As I mentioned, City Hall must become more transparent. Increased transparency and streamlining processes should help all builders and developers. It should also level the playing field. We need to bring all parties to the table to find solutions and to educate one another on the challenges Calgary faces. The system/process must create and maintain two-way dialogue. I would work to create a system to coordinate communication between different departments to create a modernized development process. This would include all stakeholders and be done in a timely manner. Industry groups should be given a chance to give suggestions and these suggestions must be considered. We almost must address and acknowledge challenges during the planning stages. Achieving consensus is a challenge when balancing the interests of neighborhoods, businesses, and other stakeholders. All parties need to work together and communicate with each other for sustainable and accessible development. For example, the city could create blocking and shadowing guidelines to make sure new developments fit the character of neighborhoods. I would work with all parties to look at the long-term implications of the development. We need to balance the economic, physical and environmental development of the neighborhood. We need to demonstrate a commitment to long term, sustainable, innovative community development.
  • Name: Jay Unsworth
  • Website: unsworth.ca
  • Email: jay@unsworth.ca
  • Candidate for Ward: 13
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: Yes

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Ward 14

Andrea Hinton

  • Can you give an example where redevelopment created a positive outcome for a community, and something that should be supported?: The communities in Ward 14 are very diverse, in that there are older communities, as well as brand new communities. Even the older communities in Ward 14 are not that old, and I do not believe redevelopment in these areas is something that many would consider. While campaigning I have observed new homes built on lots in older neighborhoods, but this does not seem to be the trend.
  • Can you give an example where redevelopment was considered a detriment for the community and something to be discouraged?: Redevelopment of older communities needs to be carefully considered due to the fact redevelopment means that densification may also occur. Just because an older neighborhood maybe able to house more people if redeveloped, it does not mean there is sufficient infrastructure to support more people. For instance, if a population in one community was to increase by 30% the schools in the area may not be able to support that many more children. Also, the roads that access communities in Calgary have been built to accommodate the population we have now. If a community went through redevelopment/densification then Calgary would also have to ensure roadways, sewer lines, water lines, and the many other services the city provides would be able to keep up with the demand a redevelopment would put on them. A unique feature of Ward 14 is the multiple lake communities that are found in it. If a developer was to redevelop these lake communities, the density of the development would have to be considered so that the members of these communities would still be able to enjoy the lakes as they do now.
  • Can you name any areas in your ward that are undergoing change or redevelopment, where the community is welcoming the redevelopment and looking forward to its benefits?: I cannot name any areas in Ward 14 that are undergoing redevelopment. The only areas that are going through change are Legacy, Walden, and Wolf Willow, because they are still under construction. At this point in time, I do not know any communities that would be open to the idea of redevelopment.
  • Are there situations where substantial parts of the community feel that change has not been beneficial for the community – how could that be improved?: If redevelopment occurs within Ward 14’s older communities the community needs to be a part of the discussion, and decision-making process.
  • Do you feel that Council and the City of Calgary understands our industry and business well enough to make effective decisions about policy and process in facilitating redevelopment, particularly in relation to small and mid-size developers/builders?: I believe that Council needs to make decisions that are in the best interest of Calgarians. If elected, it would be my responsibility to represent the people of Ward 14. In order to continue to build a stronger Calgary, redevelopment maybe a tool that should be used in some areas of the city. However, the communities need to be involved in this process. To foster economic recovery, I am for Calgary cutting red tape that is hindering the growth of small and medium sized businesses.
  • In the past, the small to medium-sized business in this industry has not been at the table representing our own voice. Do you think this is an issue? If no, why not? If yes, what would you be prepared to do to ensure our voices are heard?: I believe Calgary needs to look to small and medium sized businesses in order for our economy to diversify, recover, and grow. To allow this to happen Calgary should continue to cut unnecessary red tape, as well as listen to the concerns these businesses have within our city. The process to approach the city with concerns within an industry should not be a costly or complex process. By streamlining how businesses can approach the city is another way in which I believe Calgary could demonstrate it is open to all sizes of businesses.
  • As someone running for a seat on Council, what does accountability and credibility mean to you?: To me accountability means that I would take responsibility for my actions, and be transparent. I believe that city council needs to increase its transparency to the public. Increased transparency for city council means that there needs to be less closed-door council meetings, disclosure on how the city is spending money, and updates to the community on what city council is working on. In order for an individual to have credibility it means that they will follow through with what they promised to do. If elected, I intend to be a credible city council member by following through with bringing reform to city council salaries, spending in a responsible manner, investing in Calgary’s infrastructure, and making Calgary the best city to conduct business in Canada.
  • How might Council and the City help smaller builder/developers become better established and educated in the system/process?: In order to help all small businesses become better established within Calgary I believe the city needs to continue to cut red tape, and streamline business approvals. To educate small business owners on the system/processes that are in place within Calgary, there could be improvements made to the city’s website so that businesses could find information that pertains to their area specifically. The city could also have direct links to individuals businesses could contact within the city, who would be able to answer difficult questions businesses may have regarding processes within the city.
  • Name: Andrea Hinton
  • Website: www.hintonward14.com
  • Email: hintonward14@gmail.com
  • Candidate for Ward: Ward 14
  • I would like to do a virtual presentation to CICBA members. Please contact me to arrange a virtual meeting.: No